Achievements

Trials Results:

In total, 1,958,634 genocide related cases were tried through Gacaca. The courts are credited with laying the foundation for peace, reconciliation and unity in Rwanda. The Gacaca courts officially finished their work and closed on the 18 June 2012.

First category:

  • 60,552 were tried
  • 53,426 were found guilty including
  • 22,137 confessed to their crimes
  • 7,126 were acquitted.

Second category:

  • 577,528 were tried
  • 361,590 were found guilty
  • 108,821 confessed to their crimes
  • 215,938 were acquitted

Third category:

  • 1,320,554 were tried
  • 1,266,632 were found guilty
  • 94,054 confessed to their crimes
  • 54,002 were acquitted.
After the appeal trials, the final judgements give the following number:

First category:

  • 19,177 appeals
  • 2,489 acquitted
  • 16,688 found guilty
  • 6,731 confessions

Second category:

  • 134,394 appeals
  • 40,787 acquitted
  • 93,607 found guilty
  • 26,019 confessions

Third category:

  • 25,170 appeals
  • 2,563 acquitted
  • 22,607 found guilty
  • 562 confessions.
population-impact

Population impact:

The Centre for Conflict Management (CNLG) and the National University of Rwanda carried out a study to determine the extent to which Rwandans believe that Gacaca had attained its five objectives. The following are the results for each of the five objectives:

  • Finding out and disclosure of the truth about the genocide: 83.5%
  • Speeding up of genocide trials: 87%
  • Putting an end to the culture of impunity: 86.4%
  • Strengthening unity and reconciliation: 87.3%
  • Demonstrating the capacity of Rwandans to resolve their own problems: 95%
  • Overall percentage of the study: 87.84%.

Challenges that were faced by Gacaca in its inception:

  • Persistence of genocide ideology;
  • Killing and intimidation of survivors of genocide, witnesses and Inyangamugayo judges;
  • Destruction or damaging of equipment used in data collection (filing cabinets, books, forms…);
  • Inyangamugayo judges accused of participation in crimes of genocide (1.226 individuals identified);
  • Refusal to testify;
  • People moving to Provinces where they were unknown;
  • Refugees who fled Gacaca Courts;
  • Partial confession of crimes causing re-categorisation or maximum penalties;
  • Serious trauma cases (193 cases)
challenges